The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death; Continued by a Narrative of his Last Moments and Sufferings, Obtained from his Faithful Servants Chuma and Susi. David Livingstone, Horace Waller, F. R. G. S.
The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death; Continued by a Narrative of his Last Moments and Sufferings, Obtained from his Faithful Servants Chuma and Susi
The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death; Continued by a Narrative of his Last Moments and Sufferings, Obtained from his Faithful Servants Chuma and Susi

The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death; Continued by a Narrative of his Last Moments and Sufferings, Obtained from his Faithful Servants Chuma and Susi

London: John Murray, 1874. First edition. Hardcover. 2vol. 8vo. [3], iv-xvi, [1], 2-360, [2]; [3], iv-vii, [2], 2-346 pp. Three-quarter bound (by Palmer & Howe) in contemporary smooth maroon calf over pebbled maroon cloth, edges of cloth ruled in gilt; spine in five compartments with two green morocco labels lettered in gilt; marbled textblocks, endpapers, and pastedowns. Volume one illustrated by a frontispiece portrait of David Livingstone, six additional plates, and several in-text illustrations. Volume two illustrated by a frontispiece and thirteen additional plates, a color fold-out map, a color pocket map, and numerous in-text illustrations. A couple of the plates in volume two are facsimiles of Livingstone's journal entries. Contemporary bookplate of Albert McGill, with his motto "Sine Fine" on each pastedown. Oxford DNB, Roberts, A.D., "David Livingstone". These are the final writings of David Livingstone, shortly before his death in 1873. He was seeking the source of the Lualaba, which he thought was the source of the Nile. Livingstone succumbed to his injuries and illnesses he suffered from his travels around equatorial Africa. While Livingstone was an advocate for native sovereignty and a firm abolitionist, historians argue that he renewed the justification for British imperialism on African lands. While Livingstone genuinely believed in spreading the Christian gospel, economic imperialists used this pretense to invade and control many parts of Africa. These journals are a record of Livingstone's final days, a first-hand account of travel around nineteenth-century central Africa, and one of the high spots of nineteenth-century African exploration. Very Good. Item #00008921

A Very Good set with an occasional, faint dampstain to the margins of some of the plates, not affecting the visibility or sharpness of any of them. Bindings are sharp with very mild mellowing to the spine's leather.

Price: $850.00